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IVF Breast Cancer

General Questions

[spoiler title=”Who should take this test?” open=”0″ style=”2″]

Ideally, all women should have this information about their bodies; preferably before they become sexually active.

Other times to consider the test are:

  • Before or After the use of In Vitro Fertilization Medications
  • Before or After Hormonal Replacement Therapy or Bio-Identical Hormone Use
  • Peri-Menopausal women who are having severe symptoms
  • Women who have Breast Cancer in their family or are considered High Risk
  • Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer Survivors
  • Before considering Birth Control Pills for women who have a history of breast cancer, endometriosis or infertility in their family
[/spoiler] [spoiler title=”Why doesn’t my doctor use this test? ” open=”0″ style=”2″] Genetic testing is a fairly recent addition to the medical tool kit. The decoding of the human genome in 2003 is a very recent medical development. The use of genetics in most doctors’ clinical practice is becoming more common but it is still early in the adoption of genetic testing as a regular testing tool. If you Doctor is not using this test, it is almost certainly because they do not know that estrogen metabolism testing is now commercially available. Within several years, we expect genetic testing to become integrated within clinical practices for all specialties.

There are some areas where genetics is in regular use. Genetics has been more commonly adapted within Oncology, Pharmacology and Orphan Diseases. For example: Cancerous tumors are often genetically tested and patient’s response to cancer medications is becoming much more common. The FDA insists that patients take genetic tests before taking certain heart medications. Genetic testing has been used in reproductive endocrinology on the embryos for many years. It is often used on both parents before they begin fertility treatments.
[/spoiler] [spoiler title=”How long does the test take?” open=”0″ style=”2″] Once you or your doctor orders the test, your test kit will be mailed to you.

If your doctor ordered the test, they will be e-mailed or mailed to within 10 days after the laboratory receives your test kit. If your ordered the test directly, test results will be e-mailed to our genetic counselor within 10 days after receives your test kit. You must schedule a telephone appointment with the genetic counselor in order for them to review your results with you. We recommend that you schedule this appointment when you order your test.
[/spoiler] [spoiler title=”I have questions about my test report. Can I call you?” open=”0″ style=”2″] Your test results include a free session with a licensed, board-certified genetic professional. We strongly encourage you to make an appointment to talk of our counselors if you have not already. Alternatively, your can have your physician call us to discuss your results.
[/spoiler] [spoiler title=”Why is genetics important to estrogen function?” open=”0″ style=”2″] Genetic testing provides information about your lifelong underlying estrogen metabolism function. This information will allow you to make better decisions about your lifelong fertility cycle. It is possible to measure your estrogen metabolism through urine testing. Urine tests are ‘point-in-time’ tests which provide valuable information for that moment in your life.
[/spoiler] [spoiler title=”If the test results show genetic variations, will I develop breast cancer?” open=”0″ style=”2″] No. This test is measuring estrogen metabolism function; not breast cancer risk. The scientific clinical studies on which this test is based measure cumulative estrogen exposure and genetic variation with breast cancer patients and control groups. Extensive research has shown a strong link between elevated estrogen levels and breast cancer. If your estrogen metabolism gene function is impaired, you will not be able to excrete excess estrogen as effectively as women with normal gene function and therefore are at greater risk of having elevated estrogen levels.
[/spoiler] [spoiler title=”How many times will I take this test?” open=”0″ style=”2″] Once. Your genetic make-up will not change.
[/spoiler] [spoiler title=”Can I improve my estrogen metabolism?” open=”0″ style=”2″] Yes. The Estrogen Gene Test only test genes whose ‘switches’ may be turned ‘on’ and ‘off’. While the gene makeup will never change, the gene pathway may be altered through the use of nutrition, exercise, stress levels and nutritional supplements.
[/spoiler] [spoiler title=”If I have genetic variations, can I lessen my breast cancer risk?” open=”0″ style=”2″] Yes. Your doctor or genetic counselor will recommend supplements, dietary and lifestyle interventions to help you improve your estrogen metabolism. If your estrogen metabolism improves, your cumulative exposure to estrogen will lessen.
[/spoiler] [spoiler title=”How can I tell if my estrogen metabolism improves?” open=”0″ style=”2″] Your doctor can monitor if the recommendations have improved your estrogen metabolism by taking ‘point in time’ urine test that measure the estrogen levels of 2-OHe, 4-OHE and 16-OHE. Your doctor will take a baseline test, then test you quarterly until your metabolism improves and then yearly.
[/spoiler] [spoiler title=”How were the genes for this test chosen?” open=”0″ style=”2″] The genes chosen for this test were chosen after exhaustive reviews of the peer-reviewed clinical studies and scientific reports and the strength of the evidence linking genetic variations to increased breast cancer risk. Please review the summaries of this literature in our references section within this report or on the website to easily access the full studies.
[/spoiler] [spoiler title=”How were the recommended interventions for the test results chosen?” open=”0″ style=”2″] The interventions for the genes chosen for this test were chosen after exhaustive reviews of the peer-reviewed clinical studies, scientific reports and the strength of the evidence demonstrating a pathway change from the introduction of various supplements. Please review the summaries of this literature in our references section within this report or on the website to easily access the full studies.
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Breast Cancer Survivors

[spoiler title=”If I already have Estrogen Positive Breast Cancer, why should I bother taking the test? Shouldn’t I just take the recommended supplements that I see in the sample report?” open=”0″ style=”2″] The Beauty of Genetic testing is that it allows treatment to be tailored to the individual. Substances that may benefit or deplete are known so educated guessing from bell curve studies is no longer necessary. If you have Breast Cancer, it is critically important that you take only exactly what will benefit you and not ‘guess’ if these supplements will help.
[/spoiler] [spoiler title=”If I have Estrogen Positive Breast Cancer, can improving my estrogen metabolism improve my recurrence odds?” open=”0″ style=”2″] Breast Cancer is a highly individual disease and therefore generalizations are not advised. That being said, a ‘garden variety’ early stage (Stage 0-2) estrogen positive breast cancer patient has an approximately 25-30% change of recurrence even after all available traditional cancer treatments of surgery, chemotherapy, radiation and ongoing hormonal medications such as Tamoxifen and Aromitase Inhibitors.

There are several ongoing studies which are evaluating whether estrogen metabolism improvement in conjunction with ongoing hormonal medications will improve recurrence rates. Tamoxifen and Aromitase Inhibitors work on Estrogen Receptors but do not address the metabolism function. (See Chart A in White PaperXXXXX) At Estrogen Gene Test Company, we strongly encourage every breast cancer survivor to learn their genetic variations, take steps to improve their estrogen metabolism, participate in our ongoing research and improve breast cancer recurrence and survival rates.
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Hormonal Therapy Patients

[spoiler title=”If I have genetic variations, does it mean that I will develop breast cancer if I use Hormonal Replacement Therapy or Bio-Identical Hormones?” open=”0″ style=”2″] You must discuss your own specific risks with your physician. HRT or Bio-Identical Hormones are commonly used to mitigate the unpleasant side effects of menopause. You are your physician can weigh these risks and consider alternatives to HRT or Bio-Identicals to mitigate your symptoms.

The scientific clinical studies on which this test is based measured cumulative estrogen exposure and genetic variation with breast cancer patients and control groups. There is extensive research on HRT user and it has shown a strong link between elevated estrogen levels and breast cancer. If your estrogen metabolism gene function is impaired, you will not be able to excrete excess estrogen as effectively as women with normal gene function. Your cumulative estrogen levels may raise your breast cancer risk.

Your doctor can discuss protocols that can monitor your estrogen metabolism function and levels to make the right decisions for you. The best thing you can do is discuss these results with your physician.
[/spoiler] [spoiler title=”If I have genetic variations, and have already taken Hormonal Therapy, will I develop Breast Cancer?” open=”0″ style=”2″] You must discuss these risks with your physician. If you have genetic variations and have had significant ‘exogenous estrogen exposure’ such as years of Hormonal Therapy then you should be monitored for Breast Cancer much more attentively than a woman without genetic variations. Improving your estrogen metabolism must be a high priority. We have observed women at high risk improve their estrogen metabolism and not develop breast cancer.
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In Vitro Fertilization Patients

[spoiler title=”If I have genetic variations, will I develop breast cancer if I undergo In Vitro Fertilization?” open=”0″ style=”2″] You must discuss these risks with your physician. The few existing studies on in-vitro fertilization and breast cancer risk have conflicting results with some studies finding no link and others finding a definite link. Adding to the confusion is that the press has sometimes used the same exact study to sometimes say that there is a ‘risk’ and there is ‘not a risk’.

The studies that used in the Estrogen Metabolism testing are based on post-menopausal women estrogen exposure, estrogen metabolism genes and their SNPs and breast cancer. These studies indicate a clear increased breast cancer risk for post menopausal women with these variations and exposure to exogenous estrogen. These studies have, for the most part, not included pre-menopausal women as breast cancer used to be an illness that struck women in their 50’s and above.

The best thing you can do is discuss your results with your physician.
[/spoiler] [spoiler title=”If I have genetic variations, and have already undergone In Vitro Fertilization treatments, will I develop Breast Cancer?” open=”0″ style=”2″] You must discuss these risks with your physician. If you have genetic variations and have had significant ‘exogenous estrogen exposure’ such as ovulation induction medications then you should be monitored for Breast Cancer much more attentively than a woman without genetic variations. Improving your estrogen metabolism must be a high priority. We have observed women at high risk improve their estrogen metabolism and not develop breast cancer.
[/spoiler] [spoiler title=”If I have genetic variations, will I develop breast cancer if I undergo in-vitro fertilization with an egg donor instead of going through ovulation induction?” open=”0″ style=”2″] You must discuss these risks with your physician. As stated above, the few existing studies on in-vitro fertilization and breast cancer risk are conflicting. When a woman is inseminated with an embryo, progesterone-based medications are used to ensure that the embryo grows within the uterine lining. The Women’s Health Initiative (LOOK AT THE STUDY ) did look at progesterone use alone however most of the research is on a combination of estrogen and progesterone. Again, these studies were done on post-menopausal women. We know of no studies on the use pre-menopausal risk of progesterone use and breast cancer. The best thing you can do is discuss these results with your physician.
[/spoiler] [spoiler title=”If I have genetic variations, will I develop breast cancer if I undergo in-vitro fertilization with an egg donor instead of going through ovulation induction?” open=”0″ style=”2″] You must discuss these risks with your physician. As stated above, the few existing studies on in-vitro fertilization and breast cancer risk are conflicting. When a woman is inseminated with an embryo, progesterone-based medications are used to ensure that the embryo grows within the uterine lining. The Women’s Health Initiative (LOOK AT THE STUDY ) did look at progesterone use alone however most of the research is on a combination of estrogen and progesterone. Again, these studies were done on post-menopausal women. We know of no studies on the use pre-menopausal risk of progesterone use and breast cancer. The best thing you can do is discuss these results with your physician.
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Our On Going Research & Research Participation

[spoiler title=”What kind of research is Estrogen Gene Test conducting?” open=”0″ style=”2″] The Estrogen Gene Test Company is participating with the Hormonal Cancer Foundation in an going observational study on women with genetic variations in their Estrogen Metabolism genes. Our goal is to accumulate data on women with the variations, estrogen exposure, track their improvement in estrogen metabolism and subsequent breast cancer avoidance diagnosis or recurrence rates.
[/spoiler] [spoiler title=”What is required of study participants?” open=”0″ style=”2″] Study participants will take a survey after first ordering the test. Those with genetic variations will be asked to periodically fill in brief questionnaires for 10 years. Ideally, we will work with your physician to obtain your urinary test results as well as the genetic test results. All data will be aggregated and kept completely private at all times. All data collection at Estrogen Gene Test is subject to the highest privacy standards as reviewed in our privacy policy statement.
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